Cook: Hummus

Cook: Hummus

After my trip to Jordan and Israel earlier this year, I have not been able to eat store bought hummus. This is because I ate my weight in the most delicious hummus ever in the Middle East. Of course, it’s not exactly surprising that the people who invented hummus do it best, but it does mean that my palate will not accept shitty hummus no more.
So what’s a girl stuck in inner city Sydney on a budget to do? Make her own of course! But whose recipe to trust? Well, there’s only one man I trusted to guide me through Israel and he would be the man who would teach me to master at-home hummus. Yotam Ottelenghi. As I mentioned, I am stuck in inner city Sydney and am a nobody, so I couldn’t exactly stroll across to London to visit the famous chef and demand hummus lessons, so the recipe he shared with Food52 would have to do.
The original recipe makes far too much hummus, more than any individual, even the most hummus obsessed, can get through alone, so this one is adapted. Fear not, cheapskates, I have tested the recipe at this size and it absolutely works and is just as delicious. Plus, aside from the overnight soaking, it’s a pretty fast process.
It keeps in the fridge for 3-5 days, depending. Trust your tastebuds, if it begins to taste funky, it’s probably time to go. If you can, pull your hummus out from the fridge at least thirty minutes before serving so that it’s at room temperature. Hummus is best at room temperature.
Yotam Ottelenghi’s best ever at-home hummus
Ingredients
  • 1 can chickpeas, drained and rinsed of their brine
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3 cups water
  • 1/2 cup plus 1 tbs tahini (light roast)
  • 2 tbs lemon juice
  • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 3 tbs ice cold water
  • Salt
  • Good quality olive oil, to serve
Method:
  1. The night before, put the chickpeas in a large bowl and cover them with cold water, double their volume. Leave overnight to soak
  2. The next day, drain the chickpeas. Put a medium saucepan on a high heat, add the drained chickpeas and baking soda and cook for three minutes, stirring constantly
  3. Add water and bring to a boil. During this time, skim off any foam or skins that float to the surface. The chickpeas will take around 20-40 minutes, depending on the size and type. You can tell if they’re cooked if they’re really tender and break easily when smushed between your fingers – but they aren’t ‘mushy’
  4. Drain the chickpeas, you should be left with around 1 1/3 cups. Place them in a food processor and blitz until you get a stiff paste
  5. With the machine still running, add the tahini paste, lemon juice, garlic and 1/2 teaspoon of salt
  6. Finally, drizzle in the ice water and allow the whole thing to blend together for about five minutes, until it’s smooth and creamy
  7. Transfer hummus to a bowl, cover it with plastic wrap and let rest for 30 minutes
  8. If you’re not using it straight away, refrigerate until needed, removing at least 30 minutes before serving
  9. Serve with a drizzle of the best olive oil you can afford